Resources

You, someone you love, and or your family don’t have to go at this alone. At LaGrone Law, we pride ourselves in answering the phone, answering your questions, and setting reasonable expectations as to what can and cannot be done in your case. We are here to fight with you, not against you. Please browse this page for a variety of helpful resources. When you’re ready to speak to someone about your case, give us a call. 

Websites

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration ServicesCheck case status, find an office, explore options, learn about green cards, and more.

Homeland Security – A collection of several employment-based immigration guides.

Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights – The Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights (GHLAR) educates, organizes, and empowers Latinos in Georgia to defend and advance their civil and human rights.

FAQ

What should I expect from a criminal defense attorney?

You should expect objective advice from your lawyer on the strengths and weaknesses of your case as well as possible plea options.

Can I go to jail if I am charged with a misdemeanor?

For misdemeanors, the penalty for which can include up to one year in county jail.

What Is A “Green Card”?

A permit allowing a foreign national to live and work in the US.

What is the basis for being deported? What are the consequences of deportation?

Removal from the United States (deportation) is the worst-case immigration consequence for a variety of crimes and immigration violations. Coming back to the U.S. after having been deported is a difficult proposition and a complicated process, but it’s not impossible.

What are some factors that are considered by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) in granting an individual immigration status?

General Eligibility Requirements

  • Be at least 18 years old at the time you file Form N-400, Application for Naturalization.
  • Be a permanent resident (have a “Green Card”) for at least 5 years.
  • Demonstrate continuous residence in the United States for at least 5 years immediately before the date you file Form N-400.
  • Show that you have been physically present in the United States for at least 30 months out of the 5 years immediately before the date you file Form N-400.
  • Show that you have lived for at least 3 months in the state or USCIS district where you apply. Students may apply for naturalization either where they go to school or where their family lives (if they are still financially dependent on their parents).
  • Be a person of good moral character.
  • Demonstrate an attachment to the principles and ideals of the U.S. Constitution.
  • Be able to read, write, and speak basic English.
  • Have a basic understanding of U.S. history and government (civics).
  • Take an oath of allegiance to the United States.
Will I Be Required to Undergo Any Other Criminal or Security Checks?

When applying for naturalization, USCIS will obtain your biometrics and run a criminal background check.

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